Friday, 10 February, 2pm, Jamie Fenton, “When Persons Become Supposed: Emily Dickinson and the American Civil War”

 
The next session of the A19 seminar series (VALE / LARCA) will take place on Friday, 10 February, 2pm-4pm.
 
Sorbonne Université, Bibliothèque de l’UFR d’études anglophones (esc. G, 2è étage; entrée par le 54 rue Saint Jacques ou le 17 rue de la Sorbonne, 75005 Paris).
 
Zoom:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83666172388?pwd=Z3VOYnBMTUg1UnRFNHBOaDRDU2Zhdz09

ID de réunion : 836 6617 2388
Code secret : 337910

When I state myself, as the Representative of the Verse — it does not mean — me — but a supposed person. Emily Dickinson to Thomas Wentworth Higginson, July 1862.

Emily Dickinson sent this cryptic statement to her mentor, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, as the United States entered its second year of civil war. This paper aims to decode the statement, by paying special attention to that innocuous word ‘supposed’. What is a ‘supposed’ person? How does Dickinson go about supposing them? What lives do they live in verse? The paper will offer two routes through this problem. First it will investigate Dickinson’s interest in dramatic monologue. Her poems have attracted the label of lyric, but this is not a truth inherent, and we should be confident in pursuing their relationship with other modes. If a supposed person is something like a character, how far are Dickinson’s poems from those of her heroes, Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning? The second route is towards the Civil War. Dickinson wrote this letter to a Higginson away at war, where she feared he had become ‘impossible’. This part of the paper will argue that ‘supposing’ was a necessary talent for civilians waiting for news of combatant relatives or friends: with no guarantee of survival, soldiers had to be imagined alive. This kind of supposing found its way into Dickinson’s poems in the voices of soldiers. The paper will end by trying to draw the two routes together, proposing, via an encounter with Shakespeare, that Dickinson’s poems can be read as the monologues of impossible people.
 
Jamie Fenton began his education at Jesus College, Cambridge, where he completed a BA in English and MPhil in American Literature, before moving on to an AHRC-funded PhD at Pembroke College, Cambridge, which he finished in 2021. In early 2020, he held a Kluge Fellowship at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. In 2021-2022, he held a postdoctoral fellowship at University College London.
His research interest is American Literature, especially the literature of the American Civil War. He practices a historical-formalist mode of close reading, which aims to work out how style emerges from and then thinks about its political and cultural environment. His PhD investigated a series of Civil War poets, including Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Laura Redden, Emily Dickinson, and Paul Laurence Dunbar. He has also written on Woody Guthrie, Henry David Thoreau, and the contemporary poet Erica Dawson.
 
Photograph of Jamie Fenton

Friday, January 27, 2pm, Todd Carmody, “Work Requirements: Literary Labour and Social Welfare”

The next session of the A19 seminar series (VALE / LARCA) will take place on Friday, January 27, 2pm-4pm.

Sorbonne Université, Bibliothèque de l’UFR d’études anglophones (esc. G, 2è étage; entrée par le 54 rue Saint Jacques ou le 17 rue de la Sorbonne, 75005 Paris).


Participer à la réunion Zoom
https://u-paris.zoom.us/j/89286080719?pwd=NHFrNXEzYzB5WmdPNjhONWNOREV3dz09

ID de réunion : 892 8608 0719
Code secret : 357391.

Work Requirements

Throughout the history of the United States, work-based social welfare practices have served to affirm the moral value of work. In the late nineteenth century this representational project came to be mediated by the printed word with the emergence of industrial print technologies, the expansion of literacy, and the rise of professionalization. In Work Requirements (Duke UP, 2022), Todd Carmody asks how work, even the most debasing or unproductive labor, came to be seen as inherently meaningful during this era. He explores how the print culture of social welfare—produced by public administrators, by economic planners, by social scientists, and in literature and the arts—tasked people on the social and economic margins, specifically racial minorities, incarcerated people, and people with disabilities, with shoring up the fundamental dignity of work as such. He also outlines how disability itself became a tool of social discipline, defined by bureaucratized institutions as the inability to work. By interrogating the representational effort necessary to make work seem inherently meaningful, Carmody ultimately reveals a forgotten history of competing efforts to think social belonging beyond or even without work.

Todd Carmody is a writer, researcher, and strategy consultant in New York and a visiting scholar at Harvard University’s W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute.

Friday, December 9, 2pm, Prof. Jennifer GREIMAN, Wake Forest University, “Unplanted to the last: Melville’s Democracy and the Poetics of Grass”

The next session of the A19 seminar series (VALE / LARCA) will take place on Friday, December 9, 2pm-4pm, Université Paris Cité, Olympe de Gouges building, room & Zoom TBA.

Jennifer Greiman will give a talk entitled:  “Unplanted to the last: Melville’s Democracy and the Poetics of Grass.”

In a famous 1851 letter to Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville describes his “ruthless democracy” as a principle of radical egalitarianism joined to a process of transience and transformation, which he figures through the cycle of grasses growing, going to seed, rooting, and growing again. From Pierre and Israel Potter in the 1850s to Clarel in the 1870s and Weeds and Wildings published a year before his 1891 death, Melville’s grasses become a key register of both the macro-politics and micro-politics of democracy across his work – a means of connecting the histories of war and settlement that transform the landscapes of upstate New York and western Massachusetts to the minutest forces of vegetable creativity and change. This talk will trace Melville’s grassy figures alongside the more famous poetic grasses of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass to tease out the difference of Melville’s conception of democracy. While both Melville and Whitman develop experimental aesthetics from the adhesive powers of democratic sociality and the figurative bounty of grass, Whitman’s poetics and prose after the Civil War is explicitly committed to the question of how poetry might plant an enduring democratic union. Melville, by contrast, holds to the radical premise that democracy is unplantable – that is, it must be understood as groundless (in Jacques Rancière’s formulation), in part, because its most militant potential derives from a combination of human and non-human creativities (in William Connolly’s). 
 

Michael Jonik is Reader in English and American Literature at the University of Sussex. He will be her respondent.

 

Jennifer Greiman is Associate Professor of English at Wake Forest University and the associate editor of Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies. She is the author of Melville’s Democracy: Radical Figuration and Political Form (forthcoming from Stanford University Press) and Democracy’s Spectacle: Sovereignty and Public Life in Antebellum American Writing (Fordham University Press, 2010) and the co-editor, with Paul Stasi, of The Last Western: Deadwood and the End of American Empire (Bloomsbury Academic, 2013). Her articles have appeared in The New Cambridge Companion to Herman MelvilleThe New Melville StudiesTimelines of American LiteratureJ19: The Journal of Nineteenth-century Americanists, LeviathanREAL, and Textual Practice. Recently,in June 2022, Jennifer Greiman was keynote at the Melville’s Energies conference in Paris.

ZOOM LINK

Participer à la réunion Zoom
https://u-paris.zoom.us/j/81113167499?pwd=emVzTlFGYlZxc3UvTjBkNlBvTStldz09

ID de réunion : 811 1316 7499
Code secret : 722796
Une seule touche sur l’appareil mobile
+19292056099,,81113167499#,,,,*722796# États-Unis (New York)
+12532050468,,81113167499#,,,,*722796# États-Unis

Composez un numéro en fonction de votre emplacement
+1 929 205 6099 États-Unis (New York)
+1 253 205 0468 États-Unis
+1 253 215 8782 États-Unis (Tacoma)
+1 301 715 8592 États-Unis (Washington DC)
+1 305 224 1968 États-Unis
+1 309 205 3325 États-Unis
+1 312 626 6799 États-Unis (Chicago)
+1 346 248 7799 États-Unis (Houston)
+1 360 209 5623 États-Unis
+1 386 347 5053 États-Unis
+1 507 473 4847 États-Unis
+1 564 217 2000 États-Unis
+1 646 931 3860 États-Unis
+1 669 444 9171 États-Unis
+1 669 900 6833 États-Unis (San Jose)
+1 689 278 1000 États-Unis
+1 719 359 4580 États-Unis
ID de réunion : 811 1316 7499
Code secret : 722796
Trouvez votre numéro local : https://u-paris.zoom.us/u/kcXRBSudeb

Participer à l’aide d’un protocole SIP
81113167499@zoomcrc.com

Participer à l’aide d’un protocole H.323
162.255.37.11 (États-Unis (Ouest))
162.255.36.11 (États-Unis (Est))
115.114.131.7 (Mumbai – Inde)
115.114.115.7 (Hyderabad – Inde)
213.19.144.110 (Amsterdam Pays-Bas)
213.244.140.110 (Allemagne)
103.122.166.55 (Australie Sydney)
103.122.167.55 (Australie Melbourne)
209.9.211.110 (RAS de Hong Kong)
64.211.144.160 (Brésil)
69.174.57.160 (Canada Toronto)
65.39.152.160 (Canada Vancouver)
207.226.132.110 (Japon Tokyo)
149.137.24.110 (Japon Osaka)
Code secret : 722796
ID de réunion : 811 1316 7499

  

Friday, Nov. 18th, 2pm, Prof. Gordon Hutner (Univ. of Illinois), editor of American Literary History, “Publishing Nineteenth-Century American Literary History”

 The next session of the A19 seminar series (VALE / LARCA) will take place on Friday, 18 November, 2pm-4pm, Université Paris Cité, Olympe de Gouges building, room 830 / Zoom (see link below).

Gordon Hutner, Editor for American Literary History and the Oxford Studies in American Literary History book series, will give a talk entitled “Publishing Nineteenth-Century American Literary History.”

It is a unique opportunity for students, faculty, and lovers of US literature to hear about Gordon Hutner’s long experience in editing American literature. We hope to see you there.

Zoom link:
https://u-paris.zoom.us/j/88487418259?pwd=Z1ZiSGVYTmp5dENYQXRQRGgzWnc0Zz09

ID de réunion : 884 8741 8259
Code secret : 211081

 

J. Michelle COGHLAN (Manchester): “Devouring New England: the Matter of Mary E. Wilkins Freeman’s Culinary Regionalism”. Seminar “À Table!” (VALE/A19) / 10 November 2022, 5:30-7pm, Sorbonne Université, Bibliothèque de l’UFR d’études anglopohones

We are delighted to invite you to the next session of the general seminar of VALE (Sorbonne Université), “À Table!,” in association with A19, on Thursday, November 10th, 5:30-7pm, on zoom.

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84404794825?pwd=NkxFcTV0bnlZNVY5NHVCMitpMnJDZz09

ID de réunion : 844 0479 4825
Code secret : 879460

The guest speaker will be J. Michelle Coghlan (Manchester) and her paper is entitled: “Devouring New England: the Matter of Mary E. Wilkins Freeman’s Culinary Regionalism”. 

Cécile Roudeau (Université Paris Cité) will be respondent.

J. Michelle Coghlan is a Senior Lecturer in American Literature and Director of the Programme in American Studies at the University of Manchester, UK. She is the author of Sensational Internationalism: the Paris Commune and the Remapping of American Memory in the Long Nineteenth Century (Edinburgh UP, 2016), which was awarded the 2017 Arthur Miller Centre First Book Prize in American Studies, and editor of The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food (Cambridge UP, 2020). She is currently at work on two projects: Louise Michel in America, forthcoming from Rutgers UP, explores Michel’s expansive influence on late-nineteenth-century American woman radicals and the wider fascination she held for Americans of various political persuasions and Culinary Designs aims to chronicle the making of American taste in the long nineteenth century; in Spring 2023, she will be guest-editing the “Radical Henry James” special issue of The Henry James Review.

https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/j.michelle.coghlan.html

Sujet : Séminaire général VALE
Heure : 17h30

Participer à la réunion Zoom
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84404794825?pwd=NkxFcTV0bnlZNVY5NHVCMitpMnJDZz09

ID de réunion : 844 0479 4825
Code secret : 879460

 

“What Does Literature Feel Like?” / 7 October 2022, 2pm-6pm

Université Paris Cité, Olympe de Gouges building, room 830 / Zoom:
 
Thomas Constantinesco (Sorbonne Université):”Introduction: What Does Literature Feel Like?”
 
Édouard Marsoin (Université Paris Cité): “Touching Whiteness in Moby-Dick
 
Adeline Chevrier-Bosseau (Sorbonne Université): “Snowblind: Embodying inarticulated affect in Cathy Marston’s choreographic translation of Ethan Frome
 
Erica Fretwell (SUNY Albany): “Sensitivity Training”
 
Q & A
 

Zoom link:

https://u-paris.zoom.us/j/88150678012?pwd=TDVxM3JMUmJ6aFJhTmc0L2JFMU5JZz09

ID de réunion : 881 5067 8012

Code secret : 957204
 
We hope to see you there!
 

C19 Americanists Abroad. Book Launch (Hannah Murray and Thomas Constantinesco) – Friday, September 23, 12-1pm (BST)

The first event of the 2022-2023 year will be a joint event with C19 Americanists Abroad organized by J. Michelle Coghlan. It will be a virtual book launch event in honour of Hannah Murray’s Liminal Whiteness in Early US Fiction and Thomas Constantinesco’s Writing Pain in the Nineteenth-Century United States.

It will take place on Friday, 23 September 12-1 pm (BST). 

Here is the link to the Dropbox folder with copies of Hannah and Thomas’s introductions: 

https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fo/wtxr4vzwqxvq5ptjoznai/h?dl=0&rlkey=g5mp9pmj4i22pwmdmiouzqagl

 

And here is the Zoom link for this event:

Topic: Americanists Abroad Virtual Book Launch (Constantinesco and Murray)

Time: Sep 23, 2022 12:00 PM London

 

Join Zoom Meeting

https://zoom.us/j/92823128661

 

Meeting ID: 928 2312 8661

Passcode: 030386

C19 Americanists Abroad-Article Spotlight (E. Forbes and E. Marsoin)

A 19 is happy to share a second event of the C19 Americanists Abroad group, of which A19 is a member.

It will take place online on Friday, June 17th at 1 pm (Paris) and will feature two articles:

Erin Forbes, “Do Black Ghosts Matter? Harriet Jacobs’ Spiritualism,” awarded the 1921 Prize in American Literature (2021)

and

Edouard Marsoin, “‘No Land of Pleasure Unalloyed’: Economies of Pleasure and Pain in Melville’s Typee and Omoo” awarded the Hennig Cohen Prize (2021)

Here’s the link to Erin and Édouard’s articles:https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fo/jvsk5mz8x7qaxnvze9qg5/h?dl=0&rlkey=9t2ydn8942gjwsf29g92dbx84

 

 

Vendredi 8 avril, 14h (OdG + zoom) — Hélène Valance (U. de Franche-Comté): « Inconséquences historiques : Les visions anachroniques de Susan Fenimore Cooper dans “A Dissolving View” »

Ce séminaire aura lieu à l’Université Paris Cité (ex-Université de Paris), bâtiment Olympe de Gouges, salle 830 à 14h.

Hélène Valance est maîtresse de conférences à l’Université de Franche-Comté. Elle est spécialiste de l’histoire visuelle des États-Unis (plus particulièrement 19ème-20ème siècles). Elle est l’autrice de Nocturne. Night in American Art, 1890-1917 (Yale Université Press, 2018, à reparaître en 2022). Son projet actuel est consacré aux représentations de l’histoire nationale dans la culture visuelle des États-Unis au cours du long 19ème siècle. 

Cette communication examine « A Dissolving View », un essai de la naturaliste et écrivaine Susan Fenimore Cooper, qui considère le paysage naturel américain dans une perspective historique, transatlantique, et médiée par les technologies de l’image, dont la lanterne magique qui lui donne son titre. Il met en scène le regard de l’autrice contemplant depuis le sommet d’une colline la petite ville de Cooperstown, fondée par son grand-père sur les rives du lac Otsego dans l’actuel état de New York. Cooper part du spectacle de la vallée « s’étendant à [ses] pieds comme une magnifique carte » (« like a beautiful map ») pour déployer une réflexion sur les rapports entre histoire et paysage, sous-tendue par une comparaison entre l’Europe et l’Amérique du Nord. Après avoir retracé les grands moments de l’humanité et de son impact sur le paysage (des tumuli anciens aux ruines médiévales), Cooper souligne combien les édifices américains, marqués par une logique capitaliste et utilitaire, semblent précaires au regard de l’histoire longue. Les dernières pages du texte voient ces considérations généralisantes culminer en une vision inattendue : abandonnant le ton formel de l’essai, l’autrice plonge le lecteur dans un moment de pure fantaisie, dans tous les sens du terme. Armée d’une branche d’hamamélis (witch-hazel), elle projette sur le paysage une fantasmagorie qui rejoue l’inévitable comparaison entre Europe et Amérique, mais en remontant le passé. L’illusion fait disparaître, d’abord, toute trace d’occupation par les colons pour retourner le paysage à son état « sauvage ». Mais l’autrice va plus loin encore, et superpose sur cette nature américaine un paysage européen imaginaire. Le paysage naturel devient ainsi le terrain d’une histoire alternative, décalée et re-cadrée dans un « jeu de cadavre exquis architectural » (« a game of architectural consequences »). La communication reviendra en particulier sur les enjeux esthétiques de l’essai, en le replaçant dans la culture visuelle et artistique de son époque.  

 

 “Playing with historical consequences: Susan Fenimore Cooper’s anachronistic vision in ‘A Dissolving View'”. 

This paper examines “A Dissolving View,” an essay by naturalist and writer Susan Fenimore Cooper, which considers the American natural landscape from a historical, transatlantic perspective mediated by image technologies such as the magic lantern. It stages the author gazing from a hilltop at the small town of Cooperstown, founded by her grandfather on the shores of Otsego Lake. Cooper begins with the sight of the valley “stretching out at [her] feet like a beautiful map” to develop a reflection on the relationship between history and landscape, underpinned by a comparison between Europe and North America. After tracing major moments of humanity’s history and their impact on the landscape (from ancient burial mounds to medieval ruins), Cooper emphasizes how American buildings, marked by a capitalist and utilitarian logic, seem precarious in the face of long history. The last pages of the text see these generalizing considerations culminate in an unexpected vision: abandoning the formal tone of the essay, the author plunges the reader into a moment of pure fantasy. Armed with a branch of witch-hazel, she projects a phantasmagoria on the landscape, replaying the inevitable comparison between Europe and America, but going back in time. The illusion makes all traces of occupation by European settlers disappear in order to return the landscape to its “wild” state. But the author goes even further, and superimposes an imaginary European landscape on this restored wilderness. The natural landscape thus becomes the terrain of an alternative history, shifting and reframed in a “game of architectural consequences”. The paper will focus on the aesthetic issues of the essay, by placing it in the visual and artistic culture of its time.   

Cécile Roudeau vous invite à une réunion Zoom planifiée.

Sujet : A19 -H. Valance
Heure : 8 avr. 2022 02:00 PM Paris

Participer à la réunion Zoom
https://u-paris.zoom.us/j/87834942813?pwd=WEFSWlZTQ1J5L1EwdWpRQ0xUWnUvUT09

ID de réunion : 878 3494 2813
Code secret : 170791
Une seule touche sur l’appareil mobile
+13462487799,,87834942813#,,,,*170791# États-Unis (Houston)
+16699006833,,87834942813#,,,,*170791# États-Unis (San Jose)

Composez un numéro en fonction de votre emplacement
+1 346 248 7799 États-Unis (Houston)
+1 669 900 6833 États-Unis (San Jose)
+1 929 205 6099 États-Unis (New York)
+1 253 215 8782 États-Unis (Tacoma)
+1 301 715 8592 États-Unis (Washington DC)
+1 312 626 6799 États-Unis (Chicago)
ID de réunion : 878 3494 2813
Code secret : 170791
Trouvez votre numéro local : https://u-paris.zoom.us/u/kssTFIMsz

Participer à l’aide d’un protocole SIP
87834942813@zoomcrc.com

Participer à l’aide d’un protocole H.323
162.255.37.11 (États-Unis (Ouest))
162.255.36.11 (États-Unis (Est))
115.114.131.7 (Mumbai – Inde)
115.114.115.7 (Hyderabad – Inde)
213.19.144.110 (Amsterdam Pays-Bas)
213.244.140.110 (Allemagne)
103.122.166.55 (Australie Sydney)
103.122.167.55 (Australie Melbourne)
209.9.211.110 (RAS de Hong Kong)
64.211.144.160 (Brésil)
69.174.57.160 (Canada Toronto)
65.39.152.160 (Canada Vancouver)
207.226.132.110 (Japon Tokyo)
149.137.24.110 (Japon Osaka)
Code secret : 170791
ID de réunion : 878 3494 2813

Friday, March 18th, 2pm (zoom + OdG 830): Antoine Traisnel (U of Michigan) and Michael Jonik (U of Sussex) in conversation

Antoine Traisnel (University of Michigan) In the Doldrums: Plastic and the Sea” (with the Environmental Humanities Research Group)

In this creative-critical essay, co-written with Thangam Ravindranathan (Brown University), we reflect on the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, an area of marine debris spanning 1.6 million kilometers in the North Pacific Ocean. The 87,000 metric tons of non-biodegradable plastic bits and particles gathering in this span of ocean—due to a particular confluence of marine currents in the subtropical convergence zone and the “trapping” of litter in the stable center of the resulting vortex—occupies today the exact zones that used to be known in the Age of Sail as the doldrums—the “dead calm” described by sailors and writers, most famously in Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner, some of Melville’s writings and Lévi-Strauss’s Tristes Tropiques. In the doldrums, due to the complete absence of wind for weeks at a time, ships would be stranded, both space and time seemingly at a standstill. If technologies for “annihilating space and time” (Marx), and specifically fossil-fuel-powered motorized speed, took humans decidedly out of the doldrums, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch stands as a testament to the fact that no speed is fast enough for a metaphor to transcend its own material remainder. From the fuel that powered the ships and factories and fast urban lives of industrial modernity came also petrochemicals, notably plastic, that will not biodegrade—or “go away”—within actionable time. The tons of plastic in the North Pacific gather as the indelible waste of mass consumer culture and pose an extremely toxic danger to marine ecosystems. This talk, experimenting with the formal conceit of an interstitial chapter to Moby Dick (where the Pequod finds itself mired in a sea of debris), meditates on the impeccable if submerged chiasmus-like operations linking dematerialization and matter, the metaphorical and the earthly, transcendence and disposal, that work at the heart of capitalist modernity, and that make the Great Pacific Garbage Patch a haunting “hyper-object” (Morton) of our space-time. 

Michael Jonik (University of Sussex) A Dictionary of the Indian Languages”: Thoreau’s Ecopoetic Ethnobotany”

At the end of his Maine Woods, Thoreau adds a brief “Appendix” containing plant and animal names (including Latin nomenclature and common English names), advice for those who would “outfit” an excursion upriver in Maine, and a “List of Indian Words.” The latter list relates primarily to place names or to geographical or topographical features of the Penobscot valley, and signals Thoreau’s diverse yet intense interests in cartography and toponymy, geology and hydrodynamics, botany and zoology, anthropology and Colonial history, and, indeed, philology and poetics. Thoreau had compiled this multilingual list of words from the Abenaki language from a variety of sources, including Sébastien Rasles’s A Dictionary of the Abnaki Language, in North America (which translated Abenaki into French), Willamson’s History of Maine, and words he learned directly from hisPenobscot guides (especially Joe Polis) during his three excursions recounted in “Ktaadn,” “Chesuncook,” and “The Allegash and the East Branch.” In this presentation, I explore his increasing intimacy with Native American understandings of the environment, epistemologies, cultures and lifeways: an eco-political phronesis outside white liberal knowledge structures, or what he calls in “Walking” a “more perfect Indian wisdom.” He celebrates this new intimacy with the natural world that Native American words offer him in his journal on March 5, 1858: “A dictionary of the Indian Languages reveals another and wholly new life to us. … It reveals to me a life within a life” (March 5, 1858). Building on such moments, this paper investigates the implications of Thoreau’s inclusion of Indigenous languages in his writings, especially his use of Abenaki words The Maine Woods, as well as instances from his journals and selections from his “Indian Notebooks.” My contention here is that Thoreau’s increasingly sensitive inclusion of Abenaki words across his three excursions recounted in The Maine Woods indicates a shift away from a Romantic tropology of Native Americans as primitive and vanquished in his thinking. Instead, Thoreau uses words as a means to engage a living Indigenous population and to discern a more vibrant and intimate relational ontology of plant and animal life previously foreclosed to him. At the same time, Thoreau’s interleaving of Indigenous languages into his writing does not happen separately from that of the Latin taxa or French words that often appear in his texts, but rather creates a dynamic, multilingual palimpsest of his ecopoetical experiences.  

Antoine Traisnel is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and English at the University of Michigan. He holds doctorates in American Literature from Université Lille 3 (2009) and Comparative Literature from Brown University (2013). His published books, essays, and translations span the fields of American, French, and German Literature; critical and literary theory; biopolitics and ecocriticism. He is author of: Capture: American Pursuits and the Making of a New Animal Condition (U Minnesota Press, 2020); Donner le change: L’impensé animal (Hermann, 2016), co-written with Thangam Ravindranathan; Hawthorne: Blasted Allegories (Aux Forges de Vulcain, 2015). He is the translator of Sheppard Lee (Aux Forges de Vulcain, 2017). His recent and current research examines cultural and literary works through the lens of biocapitalism and extinction. It explores the historical, aesthetic, and philosophical footholds of the administration of life, concerns made all the more urgent in our present of escalating necropolitical and environmental crises. He co-leads the Critical Futures Project, a research collective that explores theoretical methods for addressing the new urgency of climate change under digital and racial capitalism.

Michael Jonik teaches American literature and contemporary critical theory at the University of Sussex. He recently published Herman Melville and the Politics of the Inhuman (Cambridge University Press, 2018), and he writes on pre-1900 American literature, continental philosophy, and the history of science. Michael was previously a postdoctoral fellow at the Cornell University Society for the Humanities. He has won research grants from the Spanish government, the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, and the Leverhulme Trust, and was a fellow at the Institut d’études avancées de Paris. He is founding member of The British Association of Nineteenth-Century Americanists (BrANCA), and Reviews and Special Issues editor for the journal Textual Practice

Cécile Roudeau vous invite à une réunion Zoom planifiée.

Sujet : A19-Env. Humanities- Traisnel-Jonik
Heure : 18 mars 2022 02:00 PM Paris

Participer à la réunion Zoom
https://u-paris.zoom.us/j/81049684911?pwd=OHRoc3RzWGJLOC9UOVU0TnJiRE1BQT09

ID de réunion : 810 4968 4911
Code secret : 634006
Une seule touche sur l’appareil mobile
+13462487799,,81049684911#,,,,634006# États-Unis (Houston) +16699006833,,81049684911#,,,,634006# États-Unis (San Jose)

Composez un numéro en fonction de votre emplacement
+1 346 248 7799 États-Unis (Houston)
+1 669 900 6833 États-Unis (San Jose)
+1 929 205 6099 États-Unis (New York)
+1 253 215 8782 États-Unis (Tacoma)
+1 301 715 8592 États-Unis (Washington DC)
+1 312 626 6799 États-Unis (Chicago)
ID de réunion : 810 4968 4911
Code secret : 634006
Trouvez votre numéro local : https://u-paris.zoom.us/u/kecl4ilKoW

Participer à l’aide d’un protocole SIP
81049684911@zoomcrc.com

Participer à l’aide d’un protocole H.323
162.255.37.11 (États-Unis (Ouest))
162.255.36.11 (États-Unis (Est))
115.114.131.7 (Mumbai – Inde)
115.114.115.7 (Hyderabad – Inde)
213.19.144.110 (Amsterdam Pays-Bas)
213.244.140.110 (Allemagne)
103.122.166.55 (Australie Sydney)
103.122.167.55 (Australie Melbourne)
209.9.211.110 (RAS de Hong Kong)
64.211.144.160 (Brésil)
69.174.57.160 (Canada Toronto)
65.39.152.160 (Canada Vancouver)
207.226.132.110 (Japon Tokyo)
149.137.24.110 (Japon Osaka)
Code secret : 634006
ID de réunion : 810 4968 4911

Vendredi 18 février, 14h-15H30, Bruno Monfort (U. Paris Nanterre/LARCA UMR8225): Tempo(e)ralité » et connaissance : dire « now » et esquiver le présent dans « A Descent into the Maelström ». ZOOM ONLY.

 

Bruno Monfort est ancien élève de l’ENS-Ulm. professeur de littérature américaine à l’Université Paris Nanterre. Spécialiste du XIXe siècle, Bruno Monfort est l’auteur de nombreuses publications, notamment sur Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau et Poe. Il travaille actuellement à un ouvrage intitulé « Poe et la science :  du monde physique à sa dématérialisation ».

Sur Poe, Bruno Monfort est l’auteur de:

« Le Sphinx dénaturé : Une Écologie du discours ? » Revue Française d’Études Américaines 129 (2011): 19-34.

« Sans les mains : Vérité achéiropoiète chez Poe ». Théorie, Littérature, Epistémologie. « La Vérité en fiction ». 28 (2012) : 35-50.

« La Dynamique de l’obsession dans ‘The Fall of the House of Usher’ d’E. A. Poe ». Formes de l’obsession II. Paris : Michel Houdiard, 2007. 30-48. 

 

Cécile Roudeau vous invite à une réunion Zoom planifiée.

Sujet : A19 18 février B. Monfort
Heure : 18 févr. 2022 02:00 PM Paris

Participer à la réunion Zoom
https://u-paris.zoom.us/j/85198970302?pwd=ZTh6WVB1enc3UXJNQmFBZGdFcUwxZz09

ID de réunion : 851 9897 0302
Code secret : 432944
Une seule touche sur l’appareil mobile
+13126266799,,85198970302#,,,,*432944# États-Unis (Chicago)
+13462487799,,85198970302#,,,,*432944# États-Unis (Houston)

Composez un numéro en fonction de votre emplacement
+1 312 626 6799 États-Unis (Chicago)
+1 346 248 7799 États-Unis (Houston)
+1 669 900 6833 États-Unis (San Jose)
+1 929 205 6099 États-Unis (New York)
+1 253 215 8782 États-Unis (Tacoma)
+1 301 715 8592 États-Unis (Washington DC)
ID de réunion : 851 9897 0302
Code secret : 432944
Trouvez votre numéro local : https://u-paris.zoom.us/u/kbm96q2aQs

Participer à l’aide d’un protocole SIP
85198970302@zoomcrc.com

Participer à l’aide d’un protocole H.323
162.255.37.11 (États-Unis (Ouest))
162.255.36.11 (États-Unis (Est))
115.114.131.7 (Mumbai – Inde)
115.114.115.7 (Hyderabad – Inde)
213.19.144.110 (Amsterdam Pays-Bas)
213.244.140.110 (Allemagne)
103.122.166.55 (Australie Sydney)
103.122.167.55 (Australie Melbourne)
149.137.40.110 (Singapour)
64.211.144.160 (Brésil)
149.137.68.253 (Mexique)
69.174.57.160 (Canada Toronto)
65.39.152.160 (Canada Vancouver)
207.226.132.110 (Japon Tokyo)
149.137.24.110 (Japon Osaka)
Code secret : 432944
ID de réunion : 851 9897 0302

 

Friday, Jan. 28, 1pm-2pm, ZOOM, Americanists Abroad Virtual Book Launch- Xine Yao & Gordon Fraser

A19 thanks J. Michelle Coghlan, founder of C19 Americanists Abroad, to invite us to join this first Virtual Book Launch with

Xine Yao (UCL)– Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth Century America (Duke UP, 2021)

and

 Gordon Fraser (Univ. of Manchester), Star Territory : Printing the Universe in Nineteenth-Century America (U of Pennsylvania P, 2021).

 

Here is the link to the Dropbox folder with copies of Xine and Gordon’s introductions: 

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/rp8qeifg7ffe8y9/AAASfw5vXtbyPTJ7HTPqPyJ5a?dl=0

And here is the Zoom link for this event:

Topic: Americanists Abroad Virtual Book Launch (Yao/Fraser)

Time: Jan 28, 2022 12:00 PM London

 

Join Zoom Meeting

https://zoom.us/j/95336890428

Meeting ID: 953 3689 0428

Passcode: 193364

Transcendentalist Women in Conversation: Margaret Fuller, Sophia Ripley, and “Woman”

The seminar will ONLINE only. The zoom link is below.

Friday January 21, 2pm-4pm. ODG 340/zoom.

 A19 invites Alice de Galzain (University of Edinburgh). Her paper is entitled :

Thomas Constantinesco (Sorbonne U.) will be discussant.

 Abstract: This paper focuses on Sophia Ripley’s 1841 article “Woman,” which was published in the Dial two years before Margaret Fuller’s “The Great Lawsuit. Man Versus Men. Woman Versus Women” appeared in the same publication. Originally written as homework for one of Fuller’s Boston Conversations (1839-1844), Ripley’s plea in favor of women’s right to education perfectly epitomizes the polyphonic nature of feminist social advances in antebellum America. Inspired by Fuller’s feminist reinterpretation of William Ellery Channing’s concept of “self-culture,” viewing education as a means to improve woman’s condition, Ripley’s text debunks the concept of “separate spheres” and urges readers to consider women as intellectual beings rather than through the prism of the idealized, unrealistic “muse”. Inscribing Ripley’s article as part of the feminist stride of the Transcendental movement, I will illustrate the similarities between Ripley’s argument, Fuller’s, and that of other women Transcendentalists, while also confronting it with what Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote on the subject.

Alice de Galzain is a Ph.D. student at the University of Edinburgh. Brought up in a bilingual environment in Europe, she has studied and lived in many different countries, including France, Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States – which has played a defining role in her transnational approach to literary works. In 2017, she graduated with distinctions from the University of Edinburgh, where she completed a Master of Science in United States literature. Specialized in nineteenth-century U.S. literature, Alice’s research interests include Transcendentalism, transnational writing, abolitionism, and women’s studies. After writing her Master’s dissertation on Ralph Waldo Emerson and Thomas Carlyle’s epistolary friendship and their differences over the abolition of slavery, she is now focusing her research on the relationship between Emerson and Margaret Fuller. In particular, she plans to explore explore how both Emerson’s and Fuller’s Transcendentalist reimagining of the role and status of American women led to a redefinition of the American nation. 

Cécile Roudeau vous invite à une réunion Zoom planifiée.

 

Sujet : A19- Transcendentalist Women in Conversation

Heure : 21 janv. 2022 02:00 PM Paris

 

Participer à la réunion Zoom

https://u-paris.zoom.us/j/87846580181?pwd=TWQybVpBSnZmeEo1bUEvNEVyK0xrZz09

 

ID de réunion : 878 4658 0181

Code secret : 130476

Une seule touche sur l’appareil mobile

+13017158592,,87846580181#,,,,*130476# États-Unis (Washington DC)

+13126266799,,87846580181#,,,,*130476# États-Unis (Chicago)

 

Composez un numéro en fonction de votre emplacement

        +1 301 715 8592 États-Unis (Washington DC)

        +1 312 626 6799 États-Unis (Chicago)

        +1 346 248 7799 États-Unis (Houston)

        +1 669 900 6833 États-Unis (San Jose)

        +1 929 205 6099 États-Unis (New York)

        +1 253 215 8782 États-Unis (Tacoma)

ID de réunion : 878 4658 0181

Code secret : 130476

Trouvez votre numéro local : https://u-paris.zoom.us/u/kVmuCuWCf

 

Participer à l’aide d’un protocole SIP

87846580181@zoomcrc.com

 

Participer à l’aide d’un protocole H.323

162.255.37.11 (États-Unis (Ouest))

162.255.36.11 (États-Unis (Est))

115.114.131.7 (Mumbai – Inde)

115.114.115.7 (Hyderabad – Inde)

213.19.144.110 (Amsterdam Pays-Bas)

213.244.140.110 (Allemagne)

103.122.166.55 (Australie Sydney)

103.122.167.55 (Australie Melbourne)

149.137.40.110 (Singapour)

64.211.144.160 (Brésil)

149.137.68.253 (Mexique)

69.174.57.160 (Canada Toronto)

65.39.152.160 (Canada Vancouver)

207.226.132.110 (Japon Tokyo)

149.137.24.110 (Japon Osaka)

Code secret : 130476

ID de réunion : 878 4658 0181

Friday 10 December 2021, 2pm-4pm (zoom + OdG358): Michael Jonik (University of Sussex) “A Dictionary of the Indian Languages”: Thoreau’s Ecopoetic Ethnobotany”- respondent: Antoine Traisnel (U. of Michigan)- POSTPONED- March 18th, 2022

Abstract:

At the end of his Maine Woods, Thoreau adds a brief “Appendix” containing plant and animal names (including Latin nomenclature and common English names), advice for those who would “outfit” an excursion upriver in Maine, and a “List of Indian Words.” The latter list relates primarily to place names or to geographical or topographical features of the Penobscot valley, and signals Thoreau’s diverse yet intense interests in cartography and toponymy, geology and hydrodynamics, botany and zoology, anthropology and Colonial history, and, indeed, philology and poetics. Thoreau had compiled this multilingual list of words from the Abenaki language from a variety of sources, including Sébastien Rasles’s A Dictionary of the Abnaki Language, in North America (which translated Abenaki into French), Willamson’s History of Maine, and words he learned directly from his Penobscot guides (especially Joe Polis) during his three excursions recounted in “Ktaadn,” “Chesuncook,” and “The Allegash and the East Branch.” In this presentation, I explore his increasing intimacy with Native American understandings of the environment, epistemologies, cultures and lifeways: an eco-political phronesis outside white liberal knowledge structures, or what he calls in “Walking” a “more perfect Indian wisdom.” He celebrates this new intimacy with the natural world that Native American words offer him in his journal on March 5, 1858: “A dictionary of the Indian Languages reveals another and wholly new life to us. … It reveals to me a life within a life” (March 5, 1858). Building on such moments, this paper investigates the implications of Thoreau’s inclusion of Indigenous languages in his writings, especially his use of Abenaki words The Maine Woods, as well as instances from his journals and selections from his “Indian Notebooks.” My contention here is that Thoreau’s increasingly sensitive inclusion of Abenaki words across his three excursions recounted in The Maine Woods indicates a shift away from a Romantic tropology of Native Americans as primitive and vanquished in his thinking. Instead, Thoreau uses words as a means to engage a living Indigenous population and to discern a more vibrant and intimate relational ontology of plant and animal life previously foreclosed to him. At the same time, Thoreau’s interleaving of Indigenous languages into his writing does not happen separately from that of the Latin taxa or French words that often appear in his texts, but rather creates a dynamic, multilingual palimpsest of his ecopoetical experiences.  

Michael Jonik is Senior Lecturer in English and American Literature (English and American Studies), Director of Research and Knowledge Exchange (School of Media, Arts and Humanities) at Sussex University. Michael Jonik teaches American literature and contemporary critical theory at the University of Sussex. He recently published Herman Melville and the Politics of the Inhuman (Cambridge University Press, 2018), and he writes on pre-1900 American literature, continental philosophy, and the history of science. Michael was previously a postdoctoral fellow at the Cornell University Society for the Humanities. He has won research grants from the Spanish government, the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, and the Leverhulme Trust, and was a fellow at the Institut d’études avancées de Paris. He is founding member of The British Association of Nineteenth-Century Americanists (BrANCA), and Reviews and Special Issues editor for the journal Textual Practice

Antoine Traisnel is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and English at the University of Michigan. He holds doctorates in American Literature from Université Lille 3 (2009) and Comparative Literature from Brown University (2013). His published books, essays, and translations span the fields of American, French, and German Literature; critical and literary theory; biopolitics and ecocriticism. He is author of: Capture: American Pursuits and the Making of a New Animal Condition (U Minnesota Press, 2020); Donner le change: L’impensé animal (Hermann, 2016), co-written with Thangam Ravindranathan; Hawthorne: Blasted Allegories (Aux Forges de Vulcain, 2015). He is the translator of Sheppard Lee (Aux Forges de Vulcain, 2017). His recent and current research examines cultural and literary works through the lens of biocapitalism and extinction. It explores the historical, aesthetic, and philosophical footholds of the administration of life, concerns made all the more urgent in our present of escalating necropolitical and environmental crises. He co-leads the Critical Futures Project, a research collective that explores theoretical methods for addressing the new urgency of climate change under digital and racial capitalism.